January, 2005

Main

About me

Cooking for Kids

Cookbooks

Recipe Search

2009
  January
2008
  November
  September
  June
  January
2007
  December
  November
  October
  September
  August
  June
  May
  April
  March
  February
  January
2006
  December
  November
  October
  September
  August
  July
  June
  May
  April
  March
  January
2005
  December
  November
  October
  July
  June
  May
  April
  March
  February
  January
2004
  December
  November
  October
  September
  August
  July
  June
  May

 Subscribe with Bloglines
Quick Asian Chicken Noodle Soup
Jan 31st, 2005

Here is a possible solution when the shopping has been haphazard and you're feeling under the weather. This quick Chicken Noodle Soup has a salty soy-based broth and can be made with things that I generally always have around. It's a quick recipe, so the flavors aren't as developed as they could be, but did I mention it's quick? And salty and comforting? But because there are few ingredients, the quality of those you use really matters I think. I used homemade chicken stock and still had to add a bit of water at the end to cut the saltiness of the broth. If you use commercial chicken broth, definitely look for a low sodium version. This recipe is sodium-rific as it is.

Quick Asian Chicken Noodle Soup

6 cups of chicken stock
2 cups boiling water
2 chicken breast fillets
5 oz dried Chinese egg noodles
2 star anise
1 stick cinnamon
3 slices ginger
1/4 cup soy sauce [you may want to reduce this amount, especially if your stock is salty]
2 green onions chopped up


Heat the chicken stock, soy sauce, ginger, star anise, and cinnamon in a small soup pot and simmer for 5 or 6 minutes. Add the chicken to the pot and simmer (mediumish heat) for another 6 to 8 minutes. Meanwhile pour the boiling water over the noodles and then drain and set aside when they've softened. Remove the chicken from the pot, shred, and return to the pot along with the noodles and green onions. Taste for salt and add a bit of water if too salty. Cook until all ingredients are heated through and serve in big bowls.

I had leftovers for lunch today and I threw in some frozen edamame and green peas. The green peas worked the best to give it a bit of contrasting sweet freshness to the salty aromatic broth.

-Donna Hay, Off the Shelf: Cooking from the Pantry
Print Recipe

Comments Closed | Permalink


Almojabanas
Jan 27th, 2005

Okay, well upon reflection I think I messed these up by using the wrong cheese. The rolls were still tasty, but now I'm super curious to find out what they were supposed to taste like! The recipe calls for queso blanco, which I couldn't find at my neighborhood grocery, so I used queso fresca instead figuring they were close enough. But now I read that queso blanco is a rubbery, melty cheese like mozzarella or paneer, while queso fresca is a crumbly cheese that you often see dusted over refried beans in Mexico. So, my rolls came out a bit on the dry crumbly side and now I think I know why! Oh well, I'll try this recipe again when I can track down some queso blanco.

The recipe comes from Norman van Aken's New World Kitchen, and he claims that the original recipe for these rolls, and their Arabic name, dates back to when the Moors occupied Spain. Then the recipe was carried to the New World via the Conquistadores, and the rolls are now a Columbian specialty eaten on special occasions with hot chocolate.

He also says the best way to eat them is right out of the oven with some butter or orange marmalade. I would not disagree.


Almojabanas (Cheese Corn Rolls)

2 cups corn kernels (from 2 to 3 ears)
1 1/4 pounds queso blanco, grated
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tbsp sugar
1 1/2 tsp kosher salt
3 tbsp unsalted butter, diced, softened
2 egg yolks
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
One 12-ounce package potato starch (also called potato flour; look in the kosher food or baking section of your grocery store) [I found mine in the Japanese section - KC]


In a food processor, combine the corn, cheeses, sugar, salt, butter, and egg yolks and rocess until the mixture resembles creamy scrambled eggs [I did this part by hand].
Transfer to a large bowl. Add the baking powder to the potato starch, then fold them into the batter until incorporated and free of any lumps. Cover the dough with a damp towel and let rest for 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Grease two baking sheets.

Pull off large pieces of dough and roll into balls 1 1/2 inches in diameter (grease your hands with butter to prevent sticking if necessary). Arrange the balls about 1 inch apart on the baking sheets.

Bake for 35 minutes, or until puffed and golden.

-Norman Van Aken, New World Kitchen
Print Recipe

Comments Closed | Permalink


A New Year
Jan 26th, 2005

Wow, my cooking has just really fallen off dramatically these days. I keep waiting for life to calm down and me to get back into my routine, but maybe I need to stop waiting and start making it happen somehow.

I have done some cooking - much of it Indian recently. And I have been drinking wine and not logging it here as well. I really do want to start writing things down, because I tend to buy the same wines over and over knowing I've had them before but not remembering if they're any good. And too often the answer is no.

Oh, and I actually broke out the crockpot, only 8 years after receiving it as a wedding gift! I almost forgot about that, see what happens when I get slack about posting here?

Alright, I've made my resolutions. More recipes and reviews coming soon.


View Comments (2) | Permalink


Flatbread
Jan 4th, 2005

Here is the flatbread recipe as promised.

Olgas Flatbread

1 cup milk
1/8 cup honey
1/4 cup margarine
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
1 package active dry yeast (about 2 1/4 teaspoons)
1/4 cup warm water
1 egg
4 cups flour (I like half whole-wheat and half unbleached all-purpose flour)


Directions
Scald the milk. (Heat over medium heat until steam rises and tiny bubbles form
around the outside of the pan. But, don't boil.) Add honey, margarine and salt.
Stir until margarine melts. Set aside to cool until you're ready to add it to
the flour mixture.

Make the bread.Combine sugar, yeast and warm water. Let bubble. Add 1 1/2 cups
flour and egg to milk mixture. Add yeast and remaining flour to make a soft dough.
Knead until smooth and elastic. Cover and let rise 1 hour or so.

Bake the bread.Punch down and cut into 16 pieces. Roll each into a 6-inch round
and cook on a heated skillet approximately 15 seconds per side or until lightly
browned and slightly bubbly.

Notes
These have no preservatives so, they dry out fast (at least compared to flatbreads
you buy at the supermarket). Therefore, I freeze half of the flatbreads after I've
cooked them. To thaw, let sit on the counter or microwave wrapped in a damp paper
towel for 15 seconds or until they are as hot as you like.

-found online but link now appears to be dead
Print Recipe

Comments Closed | Permalink


Red Lentil Puree & Flatbread
Jan 4th, 2005

I don't often make recipes over and over, but here's a combination I've made three or four times since I discovered it. The red lentil puree is very much like hummus, but tangier and creamier with no tahini in it. The flatbread is fluffy and delicious. Both make great leftovers. A warm flatbread with a spread of lentil puree, a sprinkling of feta, and your choice of lettuce, red onion, and roasted red pepper makes an incredibly delicious sandwich. And the flatbread only has to rise for one hour, so it's easy to make on fairly short notice.

I'll post the Flatbread recipe in the next post.


Lentil Puree

Quick recipe

This spicy dip is delicious as part of a mezze plate or with grilled flatbread.

In a saucepan, place 1 cup red lentils and 1 cups water and boil for 2 minutes.

Cover and allow to stand for 12 minutes. Place the lentils in a food processor with 1/3 cup olive oil, cup lemon juice, 1 crushed garlic clove, 1 tsp ground
cumin and sea salt. Process until smooth.

*Note: I have found red lentils at both an Italian/Mediterranean deli and a Middle Eastern import store. You can usually find them at health food stores that have bulk bins as well. They are also called Masoor Dal.

I often have to add a bit of water to the blender to get this all to blend. You may not have that problem in a food processor, but I don't have one.

-Donna Hay, Off the Shelf: Cooking from the Pantry
Print Recipe

View Comments (7) | Permalink


Cookin' News
Jan 4th, 2005

I pretty much gave up cooking for the second half of December, and am just now easing my way back into the groove. I've been reading cookbooks and thinking about cooking, but apart from holiday baking, not a lot actually got done in the kitchen.

Christmas was at my parents house. For Christmas Eve we had the traditional Christmas Pork Pie. I'm not sure whose tradition it is other than ours (my mom insists it's Canadian) but it sure is good. I'll have to get the recipe from my mom and post it here some day. For Christmas dinner we had Cornish hens and Celeriac puree (celery root pureed with lots of butter and cream). I made an Indian cauliflower curry the next day that was pretty good - I'll post it soon.

For New Years we were planning on drinking wine and tasting the six different imported cheeses we got for Christmas. Since Shannon and Warner came over we also had a Caesar salad with Garlic Croutons, Red Lentil Puree with Flatbread, and little nibbles with the cheese - plus some good wine. Shannon, I really liked that Zinfandel - did you say you finally found it in Port Townsend?

It was my first time attempting a Caesar salad and I think the dressing was a bit watery, but I'll definitely try again and post the results if I ever get it right. The croutons were tasty though - even if Shannon did mock me for them.

The red lentil puree and flatbread recipes will get their own posts.

What did you all eat or cook for the holidays?


Comments Closed | Permalink


© 2006, Kafehaus Consulting | kymmco@excite.com