November, 2004

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Balsamic and Tomato Roast Chicken
Nov 23rd, 2004

Here's another quick recipe from the Cooking from the Pantry cookbook. The eggplant becomes very tender and really absorbs the tomatoey, vinegary sauce. I think you could use this same basic recipe but use mozzarella cheese instead of balsamic vinegar/sugar for an eggplant/chicken parmesan type dish. You might include some of the juice from the canned tomatoes in that case to offset for the missing liquid from the balsamic vinegar.

Balsamic and Tomato Roast Chicken
Serves 4

4 thick slices eggplant, cut lengthwise
4 chicken breast fillets
1 x 14 oz can whole peeled tomatoes, drained and quartered
2 tbsp salted capers, rinsed
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp brown sugar
¼ cup whole basil leaves
cracked black pepper


Preheat the oven to 400F. Place the eggplant in the bottom of a baking dish and top each slice with a chicken breast. Combine the tomatoes, capers, balsamic, oil and sugar and spread over the chicken breast.

Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through. Sprinkle with the basil leaves and pepper and serve with an arugula salad.

-Donna Hay, Off the Shelf: Cooking from the Pantry
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The Occidental Tourist
Nov 22nd, 2004

Usually when I check a cookbook out from the library, I will mark the recipes that look interesting and copy them down before returning the book. Sometimes I have to renew the book several times if there are lots of recipes that catch my eye. But very, very rarely, I read a book from the library and then must immediately go out and buy it. The Occidental Tourist by Stan Frankenthaler was one such cookbook. I read it from cover to cover and then immediately sat down at the computer and ordered it from Half.com (dude, it was cheap, like 3 bucks and it's a beautiful book - must not have caught on and sold well). The author is the owner/chef of a Boston restaurant called Salamander, and the cuisine is Asian fusion. I think what I love about the book is that it's not specific to one region or one cuisine and not tied down by tiresome attention to authenticity - but yet the recipes are elegant and complex in taste if not in preparation. Many of the recipes are probably weekend recipes rather than weeknight ones as they require a bit of time and many require advance marinating, but they're not horribly complex and fussy like some chef's cookbooks can be.

The first dish I cooked out of the book was Yang Chow Fried Rice. According to the blurb it is classic Cantonese and a nice change from a lot of soy-drenched fried rice recipes. This one has no soy.

Unfortunately, one thing it does have is Szechuan peppercorns, an ingredient that was banned from import into the US in 2000. Luckily as of September imports have started up again with new heat-treated spices that won't harm the US citrus crop. However, these peppercorns (which aren't really pepper but the round fruit from a plant related to prickly ash, whatever that is) haven't made their way to a grocery store near me yet. You can order them online and I plan to do so, but for now I just left them out of the recipe.

One note of caution - go light on the ground star anise in the Sweet Spice Mix. I added a bit much and it dominated the dish. I'd suggest upping the ratio of coriander to star anise from 2:1 to 3:1. The missing peppercorns might balance out the anise, I don't know, but just use a light hand. Add a little and then taste before adding more.


Yang Chow Fried Rice

1 tbsp light sesame oil
1 tbsp minced fresh ginger
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 small red bell pepper, finely diced
1 small red onion, finely diced
1 cup peas, blanched
1 cup diced ham (1/2 lb)
1/2 pound shrimp (16-20 count), peeled and deveined
3 eggs, beaten and scrambled in large curds
4 cups cooked jasmine rice (completely cooled)
2 scallions, white and green parts, thinly sliced
1 tsp Sweet Spice Mix
1 tsp kosher salt *see below
1/2 tsp cracked black pepper


Place a wok or skillet over medium-high heat, and when it is hot, add the oil. Add the ginger and garlic and cook until lightly caramelized, about 1 minute. Add the bell pepper and red onion, and cook for 2 minutes. Add the peas, ham, and shrimp and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 to 3
minutes. Add the eggs and rice and keep things moving; don't let the rice stick to the sides of the pan. Add the scallions, Sweet Spice Mix, salt, and pepper, continuing to stir until heated throughout, 3 to 4 minutes. Serve immediately.

Sweet Spice Mix

2 tbsp coriander seeds
1 tbsp star anise pods (or less)
1 tbsp Szechuan peppercorns

Place the spices in a dry skillet and cook over medium heat until they are lightly toasted, 2 to 3 minutes. Allow to cool, and then transfer to a spice grinder. Grind until smooth. This stores well in an airtight glass or plastic container for up to 3 months.

-Stan Frankenthaler, The Occidental Tourist
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Honey-Seared Salmon with Cilantro Noodles
Nov 19th, 2004

I don't really have a story to go with this recipe. It's good, it's fast, but you gotta love cilantro or else you won't be diggin' it. My only notes would be that the addition of a bit of soy to the honey glaze on the salmon would be nice, and I think the noodles should either be breifly nuked or chilled at the end to get them out of their state of luke-warmness.

Honey-Seared Salmon with Cilantro Noodles
Serves 4

18 ½ oz salmon fillet
2 tbsp honey
cracked black pepper
for the cilantro noodles…
7 oz dried somen, Chinese wheat or egg noodles
½ cup cilantro leaves
1/3 cup shredded mint leaves
1/3 cup basil leaves, halved
2 zucchini, shredded
1 tbsp lime juice
2 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp honey


To make the cilantro noodles, cook the noodles in boiling water for 3-5 minutes or until soft. Drain and rinse under cold running water until cool. Drain again. Combine the noodles with the coriander, mint, basil, zucchini, lime juice, soy and honey. (If you're making this for kids you might consider keeping some noodles plain.)

Cut the salmon into ¾ in wide strips and toss with the honey and pepper. Heat a non-stick frying pan over high heat. Cook the salmon for 1 minute on each side or until the honey is golden.

To serve, place the noodles on serving plates and top with the salmon.

-Donna Hay, Off the Shelf: Cooking from the Pantry
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Plum Kuchen
Nov 18th, 2004

A hallowed tradition at my place of employment (going back at least three or four years - tradition!) is the Annual Piefest, where a few people bake pies and everyone else runs to QFC and buys one. This fest is usually scheduled for the day before Halloween so those of us with little kids can bring them in with costumes and get them all sugared up. Sometimes I don't know why I bother with things like this - I could be one of those running to QFC, or just ignoring it altogether, especially since I don't eat sugar during the week so don't even eat any of the pies. But somehow I found myself at home on a Thursday night baking a pie while simultaneously doing some contract programming work I had to finish and watching the kids. It went something like this: Cup of flour, Jay put that down, okay finish this piece of code, cup of sugar, Ian do you really need more snacks?, write more code... repeat until I lose my mind.

In the end, the pie turned out well. It even survived total incomprehension on my part as to what a gratin-dish looks like (hint try a pie plate, not a large bowl type thingy). I actually had to pull the whole pie out of one dish and reassemble it in another. But the code got done, the boys didn't destroy anything too major, and the pie was happily consumed. I might try it again someday when I can actually eat it!

Note - you can use any combination of plums, apricots, peaches, and nectarines that you want. I happened to have some prepared plums in the freezer so went with that.


Plum Kuchen

1 cup plus 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
1/3 cup plus 2 tbsp sugar
1/4 tsp sea salt
4 tbsp cold unsalted butter
1 egg
1 egg yolk
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/8 tsp almond extract
1 tsp freshly grated orange zest or 1 drop Boyajian orange oil
(no I have no clue what that is - I had neither so used orange flower water)
1/4 cup milk

The Fruit and Topping
10 to 12 plums
2 tbspunsalted butter, melted
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp ground cardamom or cinnamon, optional


Preheat the oven to 375F. Lightly butter an 8-cup gratin dish or tart pan (pie plate!). Pulse the flour, sugar, and salt in a food processor, then cut in the butter to make fine crumbs. Beat the egg and egg yolk with the flavorings, then add enough milk to make 1/2 cup liquid. Add the liquid to the flour, mixing enough to make a thick dough. Brush your hands with flour, then pat the dough into the baking dish, pushing it up a little around the edges to make a rim.

Slice Italian plums in half. If they're small, leave them in halves; otherwise quarter them. If you're using round plums, such as Elephant Heart, slice them into wedges about 1/2 inch thick. Overlap them over the dough. You can really
crowd them together because they'll collapse while cooking.

Drizzle the melted butter over the fruit, then sprinkle on the sugar and cardamom, if using. Bake until the crust is golden and the fruit is soft, 35 to 45 minutes.

Serve warm if possible. Serve with softly whipped cream, maybe flavored with a little orange flower water or creme de noyaux, a liqueur made from the kernels of stone fruits.

-Jacques Pepin
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Focaccia Bread
Nov 17th, 2004

Along with the minestrone soup that I detailed below, we had Focaccia Bread made with half whole wheat flour. I love making soup and bread to go with it on a weekend when you have the time to do both. Usually I pick a quick bread, because I'm too lazy to do the whole add yeast, let it rise thing, but this recipe only requires one rather brief rising, so it fits into the soup making timeframe quite well.

I was somewhat hesitant to use a whole wheat recipe the first time I tried Focaccia - it seems to me you should make the standard recipe first and then start trying variations, but it sounded easy and good and even semi-healthy so I went for it.

This is a difficult recipe to make on a cold day in a drafty house though - the darn dough would just not rise until I practically bundled it in swaddling cloths and sang to it (well okay, I put it on top of the warm oven and covered it with a dishtowel). But the dough was really easy to mix and knead - not sticky at all.

I highly recommend this bread, especially if you have a 6 foot tall rosemary plant out back that will give up some twigs to decorate the top.


Focaccia Bread

1 package active dry yeast
1 cup warm water
1 tbsp light brown sugar
1/4 cup olive oil, divided
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup unbleached white flour
1 tsp salt
Garlic powder
Coarse salt
Fresh or dried rosemary


Pour the yeast into the warm water and let stand to dissolve for 5 to 10 minutes. Stir in the brown sugar and half of the olive oil.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flours and salt. Work the yeast mixture in, using your hands, then turn out onto a well-floured board. Knead for 5 minutes, adding additional flour if the dough is too sticky. Shape into a round and roll out into a circle with a 12-inch diameter.

Cover with a tea towel and let rise in a warm place for 30 to 40 minutes.

With your fingers, poke shallow holes all over the top at even intervals. Pour the remaining olive oil over the top evenly, then sprinkle with the garlic powder, coarse salt, and herbs.

Bake in a preheated 400° oven for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the bread is golden on top and sounds hollow when tapped. Cut into wedges to serve, or just break pieces off. Serve warm.

-Nava Atlas, Soups for All Seasons: Bountiful Vegetarian Soups
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Trader Joe's
Nov 16th, 2004

A Trader Joe's just opened up fairly near where I live, so I checked it out last weekend. Among other things I got some of their pizza dough, as I had heard good things about it, and some Greek-style Yogurt. The pizza dough didn't work so well. It was really sticky and just didn't want to spread out to 12" pizza size. The resulting pizza was good though, even if the dough was a bit doughy. Sausage on one side, caramelized onions and olives on the other, fresh mozzarella cheese and basil throughout. Really, how can that be bad?

Still looking for a quick pizza dough solution though. Lisa, you mentioned making pizza dough and saving it in the freezer for Calzones. Care to post your recipe here?

The Greek-style yogurt on the other hand was to die for. They make the yogurt with all the full-fat milk and cream they can stuff into it, then drain much of the liquid out so it's even thicker and creamier and yogurtier. Eaten plain with honey drizzled on top - creamy, tangy, sour, sweet. It's a little piece of heaven. Not exactly a diet food, but worth the indulgence.


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Pasta and Broad Bean Minestrone
Nov 12th, 2004

Okay, so I messed this recipe up all kinds of ways, and it still turned out good, so I think it's a winner. The things I did wrong were: I simmered it too long, so it ended up being thicker than it is supposed to be which was compounded by mistake #2 which was to use tiny little pasta 'stars' (about the size of a grain of rice) for the pasta instead of a larger elbow or shell noodle. The little tiny pastas soaked up lots of liquid, and with the additional simmering time made the soup more like gruel. And the third thing was that I threw in some frozen spinach at the end. Fresh spinach would have been fine, but my frozen spinach tasted suspiciously like grass.

And yet, despite all that we ate this happily for dinner and several subsequent lunches. I'm looking forward to making it again - with no mistakes this time!

Oh, and I used edamame instead of fava beans because I could not find any favas. I swear I bought a bag of frozen lima beans to substitute, but somehow between the store and home they turned into peas. I remembered how one of the restaurants Shannon & Steph and I went to in San Francisco substitued edamame for fava beans, and decided to go for it as I had some in my freezer. That was not one of my mistakes, it actually worked out well, but I will continue the fava bean hunt. Large canned white beans would probably be a good substitution as well.


Pasta and Broad Bean Minestrone
Serves 4

4 ripe tomatoes, quartered
5 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 tbsp olive oil
2 onions, finely chopped
3 stalks celery, chopped
4 slices bacon, chopped
2 cups (10 oz) shelled fava beans
5 oz small soup pasta
cracked black pepper and sea salt
1/3 cup shredded basil
8 slices crusty bread
olive oil, extra
1/3 cup finely grated parmesan cheese


Place the tomatoes and 2 cups of the stock in a blender and puree until smooth. Pour the mixture through a sieve and set aside. [This makes an almost pink, foamy liquid if you're using orange and yellow tomatoes as I was - so cool!]

Heat a large saucepan over medium to high heat. Add the oil, onions, celery and bacon and cook for 8 minutes or until the onions are soft. Add the tomato mixture, remaining stock and fava beans to the pan and simmer for 12 minutes. Add the pasta, pepper and salt and cook for a further 10 minutes or until the pasta is soft. Stir through the basil.

To serve, drizzle the bread with a little oil. Sprinkle lightly with parmesan and broil until golden. Ladle the soup into bowls and serve with the parmesan toasts.

*You can use frozen fava (broad) beans but you will need to peel them. Or try edamame or lima beans - those are easy to find in the freezer section.

-Donna Hay, Off the Shelf: Cooking from the Pantry
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Baked Chicken, Lemon, and Pea Risotto
Nov 10th, 2004

Risotto you don't have to stir! This recipe comes from a cookbook called Off the Shelf: Cooking from the Pantry written by the Australian author Donna Hay. It's a gorgeous cookbook arranged in a very modern fashion with a lot of white space and beautiful food photography. And the recipes are good - which is always a plus.

As the title indicates, the book is based around stocking a pantry and then coming up with recipes and recipe variations that are based around the pantry goods you already have. The recipes all have short ingredient lists, but still manage to provide complex flavors and tastes. She is very partial to Thai flavors, so many of the recipes are Thai inspired, the rest seem to tilt Italian. The result is definitely not for the carb-fearing, as there are lots of rice and pasta recipes.

The first one that caught my eye was the following recipe for a baked risotto. You put everything into a casserole, and the only stirring necessary is at the very end when you add some herbs and flavorings. I liked this even better the next day when the flavors had been given some time to mingle - the lemon was a bit less assertive, and the mint a bit more so.


Baked Chicken, Lemon and Pea Risotto
Serves 4

2 tbsp olive oil
3 chicken breast fillets, quartered
2 leeks, sliced
1 tbsp shredded lemon zest
2 cups Arborio or carnaroli rice
5 cups chicken stock
1 ½ cups frozen peas
2 tbsp lemon juice
½ cup finely grated parmesan cheese
2 tbsp chopped mint
cracked black pepper and sea salt


Preheat the oven to 400F. Heat a frying pan over high heat. Add the oil and chicken and cook for 3 minutes on each size or until well browned. Set aside.

Add the leeks and zest to the pan and cook for 5 minutes or until the leeks are golden. Place the leek mixture, rice and stock in a baking dish. Cover tightly with a lid or aluminum foil and bake for 20 minutes. Add the chicken
and peas to the risotto, cover tightly and bake for a further 20 minutes. The risotto will be quite liquid.

Stir the lemon juice, parmesan, mint, pepper and salt through the risotto. Stir for 2 minutes to thicken the risotto and serve.

-Donna Hay, Off the Shelf: Cooking from the Pantry
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Brussel Sprouts with Lemon-Mustard Butter
Nov 9th, 2004

Brussel Sprouts have kind of a nasty reputation, and I had never tried to cook them before. But I like all things cabbagey, and they're really just tiny little cabbages, so when I saw cute little bags of them showing up in the grocery store I grabbed one and took it home.

I searched around the internet and didn't find too many wild ways to cook them. Boiling them and dousing them with butter seemed to be the consensus. Who am I to argue with the sages of the internet? Anyway, they turned out to be quite tasty, and Jim said we should eat them more often. The boys didn't touch them, but that's nothing new.


Brussel Sprouts with Lemon-Mustard Butter

2 pounds baby Brussel Sprouts
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons minced garlic
2 teaspoons lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste


Cook Brussel Sprouts by slicing in half or cutting X'es in their bottoms and then boiling until tender (around 8 minutes). Deborah Madison of Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone has a recipe very similar to this in her book and she recommends cutting them in half because it lets them absorb the butter better. However you cook them, don't
let them cook so long they lose their bright, green color.

Meanwhile, combine the butter, mustard, garlic and lemon juice; stir until creamy. Drain the sprouts and stir in the butter mixture, salt and pepper until well combined. Then you could either put them in the microwave briefly to reheat, or (as I did) put them in a casserole in the oven to wait until the roast pork is ready. Serve hot.

-adapted from Der Interneten
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Roast Pork with Applesauce
Nov 8th, 2004

For a long time I resisted roasting - it seemed too old-fashioned, too middle America, and you had to fuss with a meat thermometer. But eventually I realized those reasons were all quite ridiculous. A pork roast is tasty, easy, and provides all sorts of yummy leftovers. And there really is no mystery to the meat thermometer - you stick it in, it renders its judgement, and you either continue to cook or declare it dinner time.

My favorite roast pork recipe involves rubbing the roast with olive oil and studding it with garlic and rosemary. But I get bored making the same recipe over and over, so I went looking for another variation.

This recipe is from Mark Bittman's The Minimalist Cooks Dinner. It has two ingredients (if you don't count salt and pepper), so definitely easy, and you get the whole 'porkchops and applesauce' thing all in one.

The only hints are that you should drain some of the water out of your applesauce before coating the pork with it - especially if you're using a no sugar added applesauce as apparently it's more watery. We ate ours with brussel sprouts and oven fries. The brussel sprouts will get their own entry soon as that was a first for me with that particular vegetable. It was all very good - the garlic and rosemary roast will probably remain my favorite though.


Roast Pork with Applesauce

One 1 1/2 to 2 pound pork loin (not tenderloin)
2 cups applesauce
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


Preheat the oven to 500F; set the oven rack as close to the top of the oven as is practical (take the thickness of the roast into account). Meanwhile, put the applesauce in a fine strainer over a bowl or in the sink to allow excess liquid to drain. Line a roasting pan with a double thickness of aluminum foil (easy cleanup!) and brush the foil with a little oil.

When the oven is hot, sprinkle the roast with salt and pepper, then spread an even layer of the applesauce all over it, using up all the applesauce. Sprinkle with a little more salt and pepper and roast, checking every 15
minutes or so to make sure the applesauce doesn't burn. It's fine if it darkens or browns, or even turns dark brown, as long as the top doesn't blacken.

Begin checking the pork with an instant-read thermometer after 45 minutes. When the internal temperature reaches 155 degrees, remove the meat from the oven. Let it rest 5 minutes before carving. Serve the sliced meat with any
accumulated juices.

-Mark Bittman, The Minimalist Cooks Dinner
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Lentil and Barley Soup
Nov 4th, 2004

I'm fond of lentil soup. I'm fond of barley in soups. And I'm sadly very fond of sausage. So when I saw a recipe in the latest Jacques Pepin cookbook (well latest to me anyway) for a soup that combined them all, I decided it must be made and consumed immediately. I must admit that I got scared upon beginning the recipe and noting that it asked for 4 quarts of chicken stock. 4 quarts. The big boxes of chicken broth that I buy in the store hold around 4 cups, otherwise known as a quart, so that means this recipe takes four whole boxes of broth! I chickened out and halved the recipe, thinking my soup pot just wasn't up to the challenge. But after seeing how quickly we consumed the half batch I made, I think my soup pot could hold the whole thing. But just barely. Next time I'll go with Jacque's recommendation to make it in a large batch and freeze what we don't eat right away. And I'll definitely take his recommendation to eat it with a "beautiful, crusty bread, a glass of wine, and a piece of cheese." That I can do.

Lentil and Barley Soup
feeds many

1 pound lentils, washed and drained
1/2 cup (4 ounces) pearl barley
4 quarts light chicken or beef stock
2 hot Italian sausages (about 5 ounces total), cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1 tbsp herbes du provence (not having any, I substituted plain old Italian seasoning)
1 tbsp salt
1 leek (8 ounces), cut into 1/2 inch pieces and washed (about 3 cups)
1 large onion (8 ounces), peeled and cut into 1/2 inch pieces (about 2 cups)
2 carrots (6 ounces), peeled and cut into 1/2 inch pieces (about 3/4 cup)
5 large cloves garlic, peeled, crushed, and coarsely chopped (2 tbsp)
1/2 tsp Tobasco hot pepper sauce (optional)
1/2 cup grated swiss cheese (optional, I used parmesan)


Place all the ingredients except the optional Tabasco and cheese in a large kettle, and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to very low, cover and cook gently for 1 1/2 hours.

Emulsify the cooked soup with a handheld immersion blender for 8 to 10 seconds to make the mixture somewhat creamy. Alternatively, place blend 2 cups of the soup in a blender and return to the remaining soup. (I never got around to this part, although I kept meaning too, but it tasted good regardless).

Add the Tabasco to the soup. Serve in bowls, garnished, if desired, with the grated cheese.

Note: This soup tends to thicken as it cools. When reheating leftover soup, thin it, if necessary, by adding a little water.

-Jacques Pepin, Encore with Claudine
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One-Pan Chicken
Nov 3rd, 2004

Cooking isn't really the first thing on my mind today, but I'm looking for things to do to stop me from dwelling. Must not dwell!

The funny thing about this recipe is that it's really just a chopped up version of the only other Nigella Lawson recipe I've actually cooked. I've read several of her cookbooks, but for some reason have only felt compelled to make this one chicken recipe. Two different ways. Anyway, she says not to get hung up on the quantities listed, and I didn't. I decreased the number of onions and peppers from 3 to 2 in order to get the whole thing into two pans. So the title is misleading - it's really a two pan chicken. But it is super easy and very, very tasty.


One-Pan Chicken

olive oil
a 3 1/2 pound chicken, cut into 8 pieces
2 1/4 pounds new potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch dice
3 medium red onions, cut into segments
16 garlic cloves, unpeeled
3 red peppers, seeded and quartered
coarse sea salt
1/2 cup chopped parsley


Preheat the oven to 425°F.

Get 2 baking dishes and pour in some olive oil to coat. Arrange the pieces of chicken, the potatoes, onions, garlic cloves, and peppers on them. Then drizzle some more oil over, making sure everything's glossy and well slicked (but not dripping), sprinkle with the salt, and bake for about 45 minutes.

When done (and test all component parts), strew over the parsley and serve straight from the baking dishes.

-Nigella Lawson, How to Eat
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Leftovers
Nov 1st, 2004

Whaddya do when you have some leftover squash soup and garlic-scallion bread? Make an egg-noodle/squash casserole with garlic-scallion bread crumb topping! This was one of those dishes I dreamed up on the drive home from work, and I think it came out really well. Now granted, most people probably aren't going to have these specific leftovers on hand very often, but the basic concept can be adapted to fit what you do have.

Boil some egg noodles, enough for a casserole made in one of those large rectangular Pyrex dishes. Drain, toss with a bit of olive oil, and put in oiled dish. Toss with leftover creamy squash soup. Maybe add a bit of chicken broth or cream if you don't have enough soup to coat all the noodles, or if the soup is too thick. Stir in some garlic and chopped microwaved bacon.

Dry a slice of garlic-scallion bread in the oven, and crumble into crumbs. Combine with some grated parmesan cheese and any basil or herbs you might have lying around. Spread over the top of the casserole.

Bake in the oven at 350F to 400F until heated through with a golden crust.

I honestly can't remember now if I added cauliflower to the casserole or not. But it would be a nice touch - just chop up some cauliflower and put it in a microwave-safe bowl with a bit of water. Seal with plastic wrap and microwave for 4 minutes. Then toss with the pasta and creamy squash before adding the topping.


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Creamy Squash Soup
Nov 1st, 2004

Here is the recipe for the soup that I made to go with the Garlic-Scallion Bread. It calls for butternut squash, but the grocery store was out, so I substituted delicata instead. Delicata is a pretty sweet squash, so I halved the amount of honey the recipe calls for, and I think even that was too much. Every one else liked it, but I thought it was a bit too sweet. I'd recommend adding the honey bit by bit, tasting often to get it to the sweetness that you like.

Creamy Squash Soup

The recipe is from Alton Brown's show Good Eats.


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