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Red Lentil Puree & Flatbread
Jan 4th, 2005

I don't often make recipes over and over, but here's a combination I've made three or four times since I discovered it. The red lentil puree is very much like hummus, but tangier and creamier with no tahini in it. The flatbread is fluffy and delicious. Both make great leftovers. A warm flatbread with a spread of lentil puree, a sprinkling of feta, and your choice of lettuce, red onion, and roasted red pepper makes an incredibly delicious sandwich. And the flatbread only has to rise for one hour, so it's easy to make on fairly short notice.

I'll post the Flatbread recipe in the next post.


Lentil Puree

Quick recipe

This spicy dip is delicious as part of a mezze plate or with grilled flatbread.

In a saucepan, place 1 cup red lentils and 1 cups water and boil for 2 minutes.

Cover and allow to stand for 12 minutes. Place the lentils in a food processor with 1/3 cup olive oil, cup lemon juice, 1 crushed garlic clove, 1 tsp ground
cumin and sea salt. Process until smooth.

*Note: I have found red lentils at both an Italian/Mediterranean deli and a Middle Eastern import store. You can usually find them at health food stores that have bulk bins as well. They are also called Masoor Dal.

I often have to add a bit of water to the blender to get this all to blend. You may not have that problem in a food processor, but I don't have one.

-Donna Hay, Off the Shelf: Cooking from the Pantry
Print Recipe

Comments

I can vouch for its yumminess- Kymm was kind enough to make it for us on New Years. Most excellent.

I wish I had recipies to post, but since I don't, I will post something dear to my heart: good tamales. I had, a few months ago, the best tamale I have ever had, and I still think about it. It was from a town called Chimayo in New Mexico, about 45 minutes from Santa Fe, which is renowned for its church that contains holy dirt. Next to the holy dirt church is a little food stand that has apparenly been there forever, and I got the aforementioned green chile and chicken tamale that lives in my dreams. If you are ever in Santa Fe, it's worth an afternoon trip - the town is very interesting, and hey, there's a church with holy dirt there as well.

-posted by Shannon on Mar 7th, 2006
Bad Shannon, torturing me with tamales I can't have. To make it up to me you must post a review of that Zinfandel you brought New Year's Eve.

So I put about 30 seconds or so of good quality thought into this, and I present to you a list of things to at least think about including in your wine review:

Vintage ('03 Zinfandel, '04 Shiraz, '02 Vouvray, etc.)
Who Made it (Gallo!)
Price you bought it for (approximate is fine)
Review - reviews like "It was good" or "I liked it" are fine with me
Foods it might be good with - if you're feeling adventurous

Let the wine reviews come rolling in!

-posted by Kymm on Mar 7th, 2006
So it was a 2001 Lake Sonoma Zin, which is one of the ubiquitous Dry Creek Valley Zinfandels. The final conclusion for Warner and I was that we like it very much. It is very fruity, so a fruity rather than spicy Zin, but not sweet or anything. I think it was like 14 or 15 a bottle, but it was difficult to find (we had it in California last summer, then spent quite a few months looking for it here before happening upon it at the food coop in my parents' small town in Washington).

After drinking French wines (which are more plentiful and reasonably priced in NY than California wines) for the last few months, the fruitiness put me off a little, but once I got over that, I decided it was quite good.

Adam called me and Warner wine snobs, but since I can't even attempt to pair this with food, I think I have to politely refuse the title.

-posted by Shannon on Mar 7th, 2006
Our current house wine is Tilsdale. I'ts one of the california three buck chuck vintages. I think it's quite good, for a casual dinner day-to-day kind of drink--the merlot and shiraz are the best, but even the chardonney is quite drinkable. and it really is three bucks.

-posted by Hetal on Mar 7th, 2006
wine snobs.

I had this amazing wine the other night at a local restaurant called Diner. The wine was Pezzalunga, but the only thing I've been able to find on it is this: https://www.madrose.com/castellazzoprint.html.

The wine was a delightful full-bodied red that was so smooth and silky and delicious. We were eating savory fare and did I mention the wine was deliscious. If any of you can find this in a local storre, I highly recommend it.

Hetal, I really like the Tilsdale Shriaz. I'm excited to try the merlot.

-posted by adm on Mar 14th, 2006
I find my system to be really sensitive to the wines that don't hurt my budget. A single glass (normal sized) can make me feel like doo doo the next day. Does this happen to anyone else?

This weekend I treated my self to a bottle of pinot noir. I chose a bottle of meridian for $7.50 and it was pretty good. I had two happy sized glasses and felt fine the next day.

-posted by steph on Mar 14th, 2006
A quickie:

Hogue Columbia Valley 2002 Cab-Merlot
Around $7 to $9
Bleh: boring, watery
Don't buy again

-posted by Kymm on Mar 14th, 2006
© 2006, Kimberly Cooperrider | kymmco@excite.com