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Cookbooks



50 Chowders : One Pot Meals - Clam, Corn, & Beyond
Jaspar White

I think one mark of a good book is that it can make you interested in something you've never considered or cared much about before. Chowders for example. (read more)



A New Way to Cook
Sally Schneider

The author claims this cookbook is the result of ten years of research, and it shows. This is an inspiring work that will no doubt be seen as one of the major cookbooks of the decade. (read more)



Crossroads Cooking: The Meeting and Mating of Ethnic Cuisines-From Burma to Texas in 200 Recipes
Elisabeth Rozin

This is an interesting book that slips a little food history in with the recipes. (read more)



Home Cooking Around the World
David Ricketts

The author does a great job of creating simple recipes that still capture the essence of the native cuisine. (read more)



Honga's Lotus Petal: Pan Asian Cuisine
Honga Im Hopgood

I love Asian food, especially Southeast Asian and Asian fusion dishes. But I own very few Asian cookbooks, really just a smattering of Thai, and I rarely pick one up from the library just to flip through. I don't know if it's the lists of ingredients that would necessitate a trip to a special store to procure, or the way the recipes all seem the same after a while (at least to my Western palate), but it's rare for me to find an Asian cookbook that I want to stay up late reading. Honga's Lotus Petal: Pan Asian Cuisine, by Honga Im Hopgood is one of those rare finds. The photographs are beautiful, the narrative is entertaining & informative, and the recipes are inventive & diverse. It probably also helps that the recipes incorporate influences from multiple countries (including the US) rather than focusing on the cuisine of one valley in Southern Laos. Plus the author has a kickass name. Honga's Lotus Petal is apparently a restaurant in Telluride. I've never heard of it, but I would definitely look it up were I ever to find myself skiing in Colorado. I see the location's influence in the book's focus on healthy, seasonal, organic ingredients. I don't think I got more than a few pages in before finding the first recipe I wanted to try, a version of cream of tomato soup that substitutes coconut milk for the cream and adds a Thai flair with lemongrass and kaffir lime leaves. The local grocery that usually stocks lemongrass was mysteriously out, but I had some lime leaves in the freezer. I just bumped up the amount of lime leaves and never really missed the lemongrass. I think you could successfully make this recipe as long as you have at least one of those two ingredients (and some fish sauce of course, you can't do anything without fish sauce!). I ate my soup for dinner with these Cilantro Noodles from Donna Hay, and enjoyed some even more the next day for lunch. The soup has a subtle, creamy, savory taste. I'll make it again and I look forward to trying many more recipes from Honga's Lotus Petal. (collapse)



New World Kitchen : Latin American and Caribbean Cuisine
Norman Van Aken

This is a great book if you're looking for good Nuevo Latino fusion cooking. (read more)



Recipes: a collection for the modern cook
Susan Spungen

Spungen covers all the basics, dishes for weeknight dinners, casual entertaining, summer barbecues, etc., but with a modern twist. (read more)



Salad People
Molly Katzen

As one of the pieces of advice most often given to parents of picky kids is to involve them in the kitchen... (read more)



The Family Kitchen : Easy and Delicious Recipes for Parents and Kids to Make and Enjoy Together
Debra Ponzek

I really like the concept behind this recently published, gorgeously laid out cookbook. (read more)



The Healthy Hedonist: More Than 200 Delectable Flexitarian Recipes for Relaxed Daily Feasts
Myra Kornfeld

Kornfeld's recipes are immensely appealing and fairly straightforward - she includes many that are Mediterranean, Mexican, Indian, or Asian inspired - and healthy without adhering to any particular dietary doctrine. (read more)



The Soup Peddler's Slow & Difficult Soups: Recipes And Reveries
David Ansel

You need to be able to look beyond the bits of stories that seem to be heading somewhere and then just don't in order to appreciate the sweetness and laid-back goofiness of this tale of a man who chucks a software development job in Austin, Texas to deliver homemade soup from a bicycle nicknamed Old Yellow. (read more)



The Urban Picnic
John Burns & Elisabeth Caton

Given the Slow Food manifesto reproduced towards the front of the book, don't expect to find any 'Fun with American cheese-food product!' type recipes here, just tasty picnic-appropriate food with some really killer sounding desserts. (read more)



The Vegetarian Family Cookbook
Nava Atlas

This is the kind of book that you leaf through and immediately resolve to eat better... (read more)



The Working Parents Cookbook: More than 200 Recipes for Great Family Meals
Jeff and Jodie Morgan

The book really shines as a collection of fairly simple, quick, and nutritious recipes good for weekday dinners and weekend picnics. (read more)



Winter harvest cookbook: How to select and prepare fresh seasonal produce all winter long
Lane Morgan

Celeriac, kale, parsnips, leeks, squash, potatoes, yams, swiss chard, beets... (read more)



© 2006, Kimberly Cooperrider | kymmco@excite.com